Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe
Types Of Pastry - Filo Recipe

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

The pastry is not new to the Indian kitchen. Most of us who cook every day are masters in doing pastry dough. Lachha paratha, rumali roti, samosa, kachori, mathri dough all fall into the category of pastry. 

Pastry in simple term is a combination of flour, fat and water. The type of and the quantity of fat, the ratio of fat to the flour differs according to the pastry type. The procedure of incorporating the fat into the dough differs too. Which determines the end result. 

If you google types of pastries you will find puff pastry, shortcrust pastry, Choux pastry, flaky pastry, filo pastry and many more.

We sometimes get overwhelmed with the information as these don’t fall into our comfort zone of food and cooking. But have you thought how quickly you can roll out a Lachha paratha, without measuring any ingredients? It’s about keeping the layers of the dough separate using fat and cooking with such a skill that the end result is golden brown, crispy outside and soft buttery delicious inside. 

All these western pastries are somehow the same, some times we have to use the solidify fat so it results in flaky layers. All I want to tell you is because the concept is new to us, we feel terrified. 

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

It’s about temperature and technique. I grantee you that you will mess up badly for the initial few times. Noting to feel bad about it and no chef in western countries would successfully achieve a stuffed parantha, lachha parantha. 

Doing a filo or shortcrust at home is possible. You will find the recipe of Filo pastry as you scroll down the page. Filo falls into my comfort zone, I happen to make it at home many times. Choux pastry requires eggs, so it, zones out for many Indian Kitchens.

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Puff pastry, however, is an art that will demand precision, patience. If you live in a hot climate you shouldn’t even try doing it unless you have a fully equipped kitchen with temperature control thing. 

Here is the recipe of home made cream rolls using puff pastry

Cream Roll Recipe

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Laminated dough , which means that fat is folded between the layers of dough such as  puff pastry, croissants, and Danishes.

The unlaminated dough is where fat is rubbed into the flour such as crusts for pies, tarts, and quiches. 

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Here are the five most common varieties of pastry dough and how they’re used:

Flaky Pastry: The most rustic and simple of all the pastry doughs, flaky pastry is used for sweet and savoury pies, quiche etc. 

Flaky pastry, also known as quick pastry, blitz pastry or rough puff. It is a light and flaky unleavened pastry that is similar to, but distinct from, puff pastry. 

The flakiest of doughs is the result of chunks of butter and gentle hand work. Overworking this dough will yield tough and crumbly pastry. 

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Shortcrust Pastry: A much more forgiving and foolproof variety of pastry, the shortcrust pastry is resilient if overworked. 

It is called pâte brisée in French does not puff up in the oven because it does not have any leavening agents. 

This dough is much more cohesive than flaky pastry, because it’s often used as the sturdy base for tarts. 

The fat and flour are “cut” into each other, rather than blended, and the ingredients are kept cold. This ensures that the fat remains distinct in the crust, and when it heats during baking, steam is released, resulting in the pockets that make a flaky crust.

Overworking the dough is also a hazard. Overworking elongates the gluten strands, creating a product that is tough, rather than light and crumbly or flaky.

When making pastry Multi-Purpose Stainless Steel Bench Scraper & Chopper is needed. It serves a great comfort when doing pastry and breads at home.

AmazonBasics Multi-Purpose Stainless Steel Bench Scraper & Chopper

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Puff Pastry: Has fat, lots of fat, fat and air being trapped between the layers of the dough to give a delicate, layered, and crisp finish. 

You can make it at home, but it is an art to create layers of fat between the layers of the dough. No mistakes are allowed. 

The production of puff pastry dough can be time-consuming, because it must be kept at a temperature of approximately 16 °C (60 °F) to keep shortening from becoming runny, and must rest in between. 

The best rolling pin for making pastry at home

HOKIPO® Stainless Steel Rolling Pin Non-Stick Silicone Belan Roller Pin for Baking, Fondant, Roti, 17 inches (AR3440-ORANGE)

I prepared these cream rolls using puff pastry. But the pastry sheets are not made at home.  

Good quality Baking Cones

STORE77® 12 Pcs DIY Non-Stick Stainless Steel Baking Cones & Tubes Set. Spiral Horn Pastry Cream Roll Tubes/Cake Cone Mold/Cannoli Forms/Croissant Shell Metal Ice Cream Roll/Funnel Shape/Kitchen/Party

Chouquette - Choux Pastry Puffs
2blissofbaking.com

Choux Pastry: Choux pastry, or pâte à choux, is made of flour, water, butter, and eggs—it’s texture is thick and sticky. 

Instead of using a rising agent, the batter is beaten together during the cooking on the medium flame until it forms a thick mass. The process traps steam, which gets released in the oven, making it rise. This creates a crispy outer shell and hollow interior that can be filled with a variety of fillings and is used for eclairs and profiteroles.

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Filo Pastry: This type of pastry is made in super-thin sheets and used as a casing for numerous delicate savoury and sweet dishes such as baklava.

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

Filo is a much drier dough that’s stretched into paper-thin sheets, and it’s layered with melted butter or oil.

Parchment Paper for baking at home

Amazon Brand – Solimo Baking Paper & Cooking Parchment Paper (20 m)

Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe

The pastry is not new to the Indian kitchen. Most of us who cook every day are masters in doing pastry dough. Lachha paratha, rumali roti, samosa, kachori, mathri dough all fall into the category of pastry. 
Filo pastry is made in super-thin sheets and used as a casing for numerous delicate savoury and sweet dishes such as baklava. I have made filo at home many times. 
Filo is a much drier dough that's stretched into paper-thin sheets, and it's layered with melted butter or oil
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Course: pastry recipe, Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe
Cuisine: middle eastern, Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe
Keyword: all about pastry, Food Photography, Food Styling, Pastry cream, Types Of Pastry – Filo Recipe, understanding pastry
Prep Time: 3 hours
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 40 minutes
Servings: 12 people

Ingredients

  • 4 cup flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4th cup oil
  • 1 and 1/3rd cup of water to knead
  • 1 tsp cornstarch

Instructions

  • Sift flour and salt into a mixing bowl and add the oil. Gradually add the water and start kneading as you add the water. Combine and knead to form a soft dough.
  • The dough will feel sticky at first, but kneading, it should develop into a dough that becomes smooth and satiny. Cover the dough and let it rest at least for 1 hour.
  • If not all the dough is being used right away, wrap the unused portion and keep chilled in the fridge up to a week. Always bring to room temp before using.
  • Divide the pastry into 12 equal portions, shaping them into smooth balls. Cover with a cloth, except the one you're working with.
  • Mix 1 tsp cornstarch and 1tsp flour together in a bowl. Dust a work surface and the first dough ball with the cornstarch mixture.
    Flatten out the dough ball and roll out into a circle, about 5 inches in diameter. Dust again with cornstarch mixture. Set circle to one side.
    Roll out 4 more dough balls to about the same diameter and stack them on the first one, dusting each layer with more of the cornstarch mixture to keep them from sticking together.
  • When you have 5 circles, roll out the stack to a larger circle about double in size, turning as you go to maintain a round shape. Separate each layer and layout the circles. Re-apply more cornstarch mixture where needed and re-stack them.
  • Roll again until the 5-layer stack is paper-thin, about 10 to 12 inches in diameter. Place on a sheet of parchment paper; top with another piece of parchment. Gently roll up the dough; wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate.
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